EQWatcher Evolution > Anatomy > Timers


What are timers?

Timers are exactly what you would expect them to be.  They wait a certain amount of time and then do something (generally they will just play a sound).  Once it's time is up and the action has been completed, the timer poofs into thin air and no longer exists (If you used EQWatcher 1.76, you may have gotten used to timers that were permanent, and were attached to triggers.  It is still possible to make these triggered timers, as explained in the conversion section of installation.)

I have attempted to make timers simple enough in EQWatcher Evolution that they can be used to easily time your food you have warming up in the microwave as you slave away at the game, without having to put too much thought into setting up the timer.  So, go make pop that pizza in the oven and set up your EQWatcher Evolution timer to warn you so you don't pull 4 too many mobs for your group's enchanter just as your pizza is about to be done.  No burnt food here please. 

Seriously now, on to the guts.

EQWatcher Evolution timers have the following characteristics, in no particular order: Name, Time, Action Type, Action Data.  Timers can be set to play a wav, a CD track, an mp3, speak some text, or execute an alias.


Name: The name of your timer can be pretty much anything you want it to be.  This name is simply used for accessing the timer after it is started (you can remove it or check the time left).  I would recommend you use unique names, yet easily remembered.  Only one timer can exist with any given name.  Timer names ARE case sensitive

Time: Internally, EQWatcher Evolution uses milliseconds as the length of time.  Since it is more convenient for humans to think in minutes and seconds, you will use minutes and seconds (60:00 being 60 minutes, 12:34 being 12 minutes 34 seconds, etc.  I'm sure you know the drill by now).

Action Type: These action types are used exactly as they are shown here (you can see how they are used further below, where the commands are explained):

Action Data: Action data tells EQWatcher which information should be sent to the selected action type.  For .WAV sounds, you must supply the filename (and path if needed) of the .WAV. For CD playing, you must supply the track number to play.  For MP3 playing, you must supply a search string (explained in the WinAMP section).  For TTS, you must supply the text to speak.  For aliases, you must supply the command to execute (such as "speed" or "ETA").


Now you should understand the basics of timers, and we can get on to creating some timers.

The command for creating timers looks like this:

timer [Action Type] "[Name]" [Length] [Action Data]

Or, if you need to quickly update a currently active timer, simply prefix it with "update " like so:

update timer [Action Type] "[Name]" [Length] [Action Data]

Examples:


"timer TTS sync "spawn" 24:00 spawn soon" will create a 24 minute timer named "spawn" that speaks "spawn soon" synchronously. 

"timer alias "test" 10:30 winamp stop" will create a 10 minute 30 second timer named "test" that executes the alias "winamp stop" (which hits the stop button in WinAMP).

"timer wav sync "improved invis" 9:45 sounds\danger.wav" will create a 9 minute 45 second timer named "improved invis" that plays danger.wav in the sounds directory (this would be useful for timing improved invis spells, that last for 10 minutes).

"update timer wav sync "improved invis" 9:45 sounds\danger.wav" will first remove and then create (and thus can be used to update an existing timer) a 9 minute 45 second timer named "improved invis" that plays danger.wav in the sounds directory (this would be useful for timing improved invis spells, that last for 10 minutes).


The command for removing timers looks like this:

timer remove "[Name]"

Examples:


"timer remove "spawn"" will remove the timer named "spawn"

"timer remove "test"" will remove the timer named "test"

"timer remove "improved invis"" will remove the timer named "improved invis"


To check the amount of time left on a timer, the command looks like this:

timer time left "[Name]"

Examples:


"timer time left "spawn"" will speak the amount of time left on the timer named "spawn"

"timer time left "test"" will speak the amount of time left on the timer named "test"

"timer time left "improved invis"" will speak the amount of time left on the timer named "improved invis"